John Jourbet: The Truth About a Loathsome Serial Killer

After last week’s Olympic Park bombing case, this week we look at Nebraska serial killer John Jourbet. Over fifteen months in 1982-1983, Jourbet killed a young boy in Portland, Maine and two in the Omaha, Nebraska area..

John Jourbet

John Jourbet clearly had a troubled childhood. He entered the world in Lawrence, Massachusetts on July 2, 1963. His parents divorced soon after his birth, and his mother did not allow Jourbet to see his father. In 1971, Jourbet and his mother moved out of the family home into a run-down apartment. Jourbet’s mother was very controlling, and by this time, he had begun to hate her as a result.

John Jourbet mugshot after his 1984 arrest.
John Jourbet mugshot after his 1984 arrest.

His schoolmates considered young John something of an outcast. He joined the Cub Scouts trying to find a way to “belong.” But it was also at this time when he began to have disturbing fantasies about murdering strangers on the street.

When Jourbet was 13, he stabbed a girl with a pencil and felt stimulated when she cried in pain. The next day, he sliced another girl with a razor blade as he biked past. In yet another incident, he beat and nearly strangled a boy. Unfortunately, he was never caught for any of these attacks.

John Jourbet Begins Killing

It was Sunday, August 22, 1982. Richard “Ricky” Stetson, 11, went jogging on the 3.5-mile Black Cove Trail near Portland, Maine. His parents notified police when Ricky had not returned home by dark. The next day, a motorist on I-295 discovered the boy’s body. Police arrested a suspect, but the forensic evidence did not match him. However, the suspected stayed in jail for nearly a year and a half before authorities released him.

Ricky Stetson, the first boy Jourbet killed
Ricky Stetson, the first boy Jourbet killed

Over a year later, on Sunday, September 18, 1983, 13-year-old Danny Joe Eberle went missing while on his newspaper route. Danny lived in the Omaha suburb of Bellevue, Nebraska and had a route for the Omaha World-Herald. He had only delivered 3 of the 70 papers on his route.

Danny Eberle
Danny Eberle

Danny’s brother also had a route for the World-Herald. He hadn’t seen Danny that Sunday but did remember a white man in a tan car following him on previous days.

Danny’s bicycle and undelivered papers turned up at the address of his fourth customer, but there was no sign of Danny. Sadly, his body was found three days later, about 4 miles from where he left his bicycle. His hands and feet were tied, and surgical tape covered his mouth. The rope used to tie Danny was quite unusual and didn’t match samples in the FBI’s database.

Another young boy disappeared from nearby Papillion, Nebraska three months later, on December 2. Christopher Walden was 12 years old. His body was found two days later, stabbed and nearly decapitated. Although there were similarities to Danny Eberle’s murder, there were differences as well.

Christopher Walden, the last Jourbet murder victim
Christopher Walden, the last Jourbet murder victim

Arrest and Trial

January 11, 1984 was a Wednesday. A preschool teacher noticed a young man driving around in the area of the murders. She thought he looked suspicious, so she wrote down is license number. When the driver saw her doing this, he stopped and threatened her before driving off. The car wasn’t tan, but it turned out to be a rental. The renter was John Jourbet, a radar technician from Offutt Air Force Base, which is in the Omaha area. His own car, a tan Chevrolet Nova, was in the shop.

When police and FBI agents searched Jourbet’s room, they discovered rope matching the rope used to bind Danny Eberle. It has been specially made for the U.S. military in South Korea.

Pioneering FBI profiler Robert K. Ressler worked up a profile for the case. The profile matched Jourbet in every respect. Ressler presented the case to a class at the FBI academy in Quantico, Virginia. There a policeman from Maine noted similarities to the case of the Stetson boy. Jourbet had been living with his mother in Portland at the time of that murder. Ressler and Maine authorities hypothesized that Jourbet joined the military to get away from the Stetson killing.

John Jourbet prison photo taken shortly before his execution in 1996
John Jourbet prison photo taken shortly before his execution in 1996

Jourbet confessed to the Nebraska murders on January 12, 1984. Charged with the murders, he initially pled not guilty but changed his plea to guilty. A three-judge panel sentenced him to death. He also received a life sentence in Maine for the Ricky Stetson murder (Maine doesn’t have the death penalty).

Epilogue

After exhausting his appeals, John Jourbet died in the Nebraska electric chair on July 17, 1996.

A book on the case by Mark Pettit and Marcelo Galvao, A Need to Kill, appeared in 2013.

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Nancy Titterton: Horsehair Makes an Important Clue to Murder

Sometimes the tiniest clue can solve a crime. Such was the case with the rape and murder of writer Nancy Titterton in 1936. In the 1930s, many of today’s forensic tools and techniques were decades in the future. Even so, forensic science was a valuable crime-fighting weapon.

Nancy Titterton, Aspiring Writer

Nancy Titterton was a budding writer (some of her stories had appeared in magazines). She married Lewis Titterton, an executive at the National Broadcasting Company, in 1929. They lived at 22 Beekman Place, then and now a fashionable area of Manhattan near the East River. The year 1936 saw Nancy working on her first novel.

Newspaper photograph of Nancy Titterton
Newspaper photograph of Nancy Titterton

On April 10, 1936, two furniture repairmen delivering a repaired sofa, found the door of the Titterton apartment open. Inside, they found Nancy dead in the bathtub. She had been raped and strangled with her own pajamas, which were still tied around her neck.

Not surprisingly, police looked at the two furniture shop men, Theodore Kruger and John Fiorenza, with suspicion. Kruger owned the shop and Fiorenza was an assistant.

The love seat sofa the Tittertons had repaired
The love seat sofa the Tittertons had repaired

Two Clues

Detectives led by Assistant Chief Inspector Lyons had only two significant clues to work with. One was a light-colored horsehair found on Nancy’s bedspread. The horsehair matched the stuffing of the sofa (furniture then often had horsehair stuffing). This heightened their suspicions against Fiorenza (Kruger’s alibi apparently satisfied investigators).

The Tittertons lived at 22 Beekman Place, Manhattan
Nancy Titterton lived with her husband at 22 Beekman Place, Manhattan

The second clue was a 13-inch length of course string. Marks on her wrists indicated that killer had used string or cord to bind Nancy’s hands during his attack. He took the cord with him, but he overlooked this small segment. Detectives found it under Nancy’s body.

Newspaper photograph of the cord detectives found under Nancy Titterton's body, leading to the capture of her killer
Newspaper photograph of the cord detectives found under Nancy Titterton’s body, leading to the capture of her killer

One other possible clue turned out to be a dead end. A smear of green paint on Nancy’s bed sheets was the shade painters were using throughout the building. However, of the four painters assigned to the job, only one had been at work the day of the murder. Building tenants were able to confirm the fourth painter’s whereabouts at the time in question.

An Obsession with Nancy Titterton

Lyons and his team began the process of finding the origin the string left at the murder scene. They eventually traced it to the Hanover Cordage Company of York, Pennsylvania. Hanover’s records disclosed that the company had sold a roll of that exact cord to Kruger’s upholstery shop.

Detectives George Swander (left) and James Hayden (right) take suspect John Fiorenza (center) from Nancy Titterton's apartment
Detectives George Swander (left) and James Hayden (right) take suspect John Fiorenza (center) from Nancy Titterton’s apartment

Upon further investigation, detectives learned that John Fiorenza had a criminal record. It included four arrests for theft and a two-year stretch in prison, where a prison psychologist diagnosed him as delusional. They hauled Fiorenza in for questioning.

Lewis Titterton (center) outside the courtroom at Fiorenza's trial.
Lewis Titterton (center) outside the courtroom at Fiorenza’s trial.

For five hours, Fiorenza denied killing Nancy Titterton before he finally broke down and confessed. He claimed he developed an infatuation with the woman when he picked up the sofa for repair on April 9. Early the next morning, he went to the Titterton apartment where he gagged Nancy and tied her hands. He then stripped her and dragged her into the bathroom where he raped her and strangled her with her own pajamas. Then he went to work, later returning with Kruger and the sofa to “discover” the body.

Epilogue

Fiorenza claimed he was insane at the time of the killing. That defense didn’t cut much ice with the jury, who convicted him of first-degree murder. He paid for this brutal murder with his life in Sing Sing’s electric chair on January 22, 1937.

In 2015, author Robert Grey Reynolds, Jr. published a book about the case, The Bathtub Murder of Crime Club Founder Nancy Evans Titterton: Good Friday April 10, 1936.

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Fingerprint Evidence Leads to Big Break in Murder Case

After meeting the elusive Lord Lucan last week, we stay in England for another murder case. But this one occurred seventy years before the allegedly homicidal earl disappeared. This is the case of the 1905 Farrow murders.

The Farrow Murders

Thomas and Ann Farrow were 71 and 65 respectively. They managed Chapman’s Oil and Colour Shop, a storefront below their home in the High Street of Deptford, South London. On Monday, March 27, 1905, employee William Jones arrived for work at 8:30 a.m. and found the shop shut. Expecting the shop to be open, Jones knocked but received no answer. Peering through a window, he saw overturned chairs. Now alarmed, he found a local resident, Louis Kidman, and the two forced the door open.

The shop in Deptford, South London, where the Farrow murders occurred
The shop in Deptford, South London, where the Farrow murders occurred

Inside, they found Thomas Farrow dead on the floor. Ann was unconscious in the couple’s bed upstairs. Both Farrows had suffered severe beatings. Jones or Kidman called for the police and a doctor, and Ann Farrow was taken to hospital. She would die there four days later without waking up.

The Police Investigate the Farrow Murders

The Farrow murders didn’t baffle police that much. There was no sign of forced entry. Mr. Farrow was still in his night clothes, leading police to conclude someone had convinced him to let the attackers in. An empty cash box estimated to have held £13 (more than £1,000 today) pointed to robbery as the motive.

The cash box recovered from the scene of the Farrow murders. Arrow points to Alfred Stratton's incriminating thumbprint.
The cash box recovered from the scene of the Farrow murders. Arrow points to Alfred Stratton’s incriminating thumbprint.

There were other clues besides the cash box. On the floor near Farrow’s body were two crude black masks made from stockings, indicating two attackers. Police also found evidence that one or both robbers washed up in a nearby basin after the attacks.

Melville MacNaughten, head of the CID, took it upon himself to examine the cash box. He noticed a greasy smudge that looked like it might be a fingerprint. MacNaughten was fully familiar with using fingerprints as a method of identification. He thought this might be a good case to test this relatively new technique. Carefully packing the cash box in his handkerchief, he took it to Scotland Yard’s nascent fingerprint bureau.

The thumbprint that convicted two murderers.
The thumbprint that convicted two murderers.

Positive Identification

When police interviewed witnesses, and there were many, most reported seeing two men leave the shop at about 7:30 on that Monday morning. One of them, Ellen Stanton, positively identified one of the men as Alfred Stratton. Stratton didn’t have a criminal record, but the police knew him to have criminal contacts. Stratton’s brother, Albert, was also known to police and he match the description of the second man.

Masks used in the Farrow murders
Masks used in the Farrow murders

Alfred Stratton’s girlfriend, Annie Cromarty, strengthened the identification. She told police that he had discarded a dark brown coat and changed his shoes the day after the murders. She also led police to £4 of the stolen cash where Stratton had hidden it. Based on this information and the eyewitness identification of Alfred Stratton, police obtained warrants and arrested the pair on April 2.

After their arrest, police fingerprinted both brothers and compared their prints to the one found on the Farrow cash box. It turned out to be an exact match to Alfred Stratton’s right thumb.

Trial and Conviction

The Stratton brothers went on trial for the Farrow murders on May 5, 1905 at London’s Old Bailey. KC Richard Muir presented the prosecution case. In addition to the eyewitness testimony, which wasn’t universally strong, he had the fingerprint. He called DI Chares Collins, established his credentials in fingerprinting, and had him explain in plain language how fingerprinting worked. Collins then demonstrated how the fingerprint on the cash box matched Alfred Stratton’s right thumbprint.

Sketch of the Albert (L) and Alfred (R) Stratton in the dock for the Farrow murders
Sketch of the Albert (L) and Alfred (R) Stratton in the dock for the Farrow murders

Naturally, the defense tried to discredit fingerprint evidence in general and Collins in particular. They called Dr. John Garson, who had been one of Collins’ mentors. Garson testified to his opinion that the cash box print didn’t match Stratton’s.

Court sketch of the Alfred and Albert Stratton
Court sketch of the Alfred and Albert Stratton

However, Garson was an expert in anthropometry—the use of body measurements for identification—not fingerprinting. Furthermore, KC Muir produced two letters Garson had written. One was to the Director of Public Prosecutions, the other was to the solicitor for the defense. In both, he offered to testify at the trial for the side that paid him more. This revelation crushed the defense and caused Mr. Justice Channell to remark that Dr. Garson was an “absolutely untrustworthy” witness.

The jury required only two hours to convict both brothers of murder and both received the usual sentence of death by hanging. Both Stratton brothers were hanged on May 23, 1905.

Epilogue

The Farrow murders case was a significant milestone in the field of criminology. It was the first case where fingerprint evidence led to a murder conviction. Today, over a century later, the use of fingerprint evidence is commonplace. Defense attorneys sometimes point to the lack of fingerprints as evidence of innocence.

Gary Powell includes the Farrow murders in his 2018 book, Convicted: Landmark Cases in British Criminal History.

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